2219 York Road, Suite 102, Lutherville-Timonium, MD 21093
(240) 782-2020
410-561-8055

Symptoms of Keratoconus

Keratoconus is the condition of eye in which the corneal tissues becomes thin and weak and loses its normal shape, attaining a conical shape due to the bulging forward.

Symptoms of Keratoconus

Keratoconus is the condition of eye in which the corneal tissues becomes thin and weak and loses its normal shape, attaining a conical shape due to the bulging forward.

Symptoms of Keratoconus

Collagen fibers in the cornea of the eye help in maintaining its shape and stopping it from bulging. However, if these fibers become weak, the shape of the cornea is lost and it attains a conical shape gradually. This is believed to be caused due to the decrease in antioxidants in the cornea.

Signs and symptoms of Keratoconus may vary with the progression of the disease. The usual symptoms include:

  • Blurring or distortion of vision
  • Glares
  • Increased sensitivity to bright light
  • Issues with night vision
  • Visual impairments resulting in changes to eyeglass prescriptions
  • Sudden worsening or clouding of vision
  • Strain on eyes
  • Irritation on corneal surface
  • Halos around lights and ghost images, especially at night
  • Headache
  • General eye pain

During an examination, Keratoconus is diagnosed if the following classic signs are present:

  • Corneal thinning
  • Atypical scarring at the apex of the cornea cone
  • Fleisher’s ring (iron colored ring) around the cone
  • Vogt’s striae (stress lines due to corneal thinning)

Note that Keratoconus can sometimes be difficult to diagnose, especially in early stages, as the symptoms associated with the initial stage of Keratoconus are also commonly found in other eye problems. Diagnosing Keratoconus may require observing the signs through slit lamp, direct inspection of the cornea, and corneal topography.

If you’re experiencing any symptoms related to Keratoconus and have not had successful treatment, contact Dr. Irwin Azman, Keratoconus Specialist to properly examine, diagnose, and manage your vision.